Video Post: A 1992 Hearing on Copyright in Legal Compilations

One interesting thing about case reporters is that even though the text of reported cases themselves been denied copyright protection by the courts, going all the way back to 1834 in Wheaton v. Peters, case reports have been consistently registered for copyright.  In the latter part of the 1980s, Mead (the service now known as Lexis) introduced star pagination, allowing a reader to identify when a new page began in the printed reporter, which was published by West.  West Publishing sued, and in 1986 the 8th Circuit held that West had shown a likelihood of success that the Mead star pagination feature infringed their copyrights in page numbers, in other words the selection and arrangement of the case text.

In 1988 the parties settled, but concerns lingered about the applicability of copyright to law reporters and other legal compilations.  This was amplified by the 1991 Supreme Court decision in Feist v. Rural Telephone, which cast the holding of the 8th Circuit in the Mead case into some doubt.  In Congress a bill was introduced to make clear that page numbers in legal compilations could not be protected by copyright.  Thus a Congressional hearing was held on May 14th, 1992, before a subcommittee of the House Judiciary Committee, to discuss the issue of whether copyright should protect such things as page numbers.  The text of this hearing has long been available, but I think it’s much more interesting on video, and in some cases it illuminates the content of the hearing as well.  I’ve included the video below.

Robert Fulton’s 1811 Steamboat Patent – Lost and Found

Robert Fulton is generally remembered as the inventor of the steamboat.  There is some controversy over his debts to previous inventors, but Fulton was the one able to develop a steamboat which was commercially successful, and which led to the rise of steamboat transit.  I hadn’t thought about it much, but his patent in his steamboat is one of the key documents in the history of American invention and technology.  That changed a bit ago when Adam Mossoff tweeted this out about how the patents Robert Fulton took out in his famous steamboat were lost, and I couldn’t just leave it be.

Perhaps nothing gets my attention more than saying that something is “lost,” so I had to look into it.  It turns out that the patents are less lost than has commonly been assumed.  Continue reading “Robert Fulton’s 1811 Steamboat Patent – Lost and Found”

All the Forgotten IP Cases, Where Do they All Come From…

Two years ago last month, I was reading the trial court opinion from White-Smith v. Apollo from 1905 (the player piano case), and I noticed a cite to a 1878 Supreme Court case I hadn’t heard of before, Perris v. Hexamer.  I gave the decision a read and found that it was about the copyrightability – or rather lack of copyrightability – of using specific colors and shapes to denote features on a map, where the alleged infringing map was of a different city (and thus obviously not copied).  At this time I was about to close out a year as the Abraham L. Kaminstein Scholar in Residence at the U.S. Copyright Office, and I was a bit loathe to admit that I’d never even heard of a Supreme Court case on copyrightability.  So, instead, I asked the coterie of IP professors I’m friends with on Facebook “why don’t people talk about Perris v. Hexamer more?” (the story continues after the jump)

Continue reading “All the Forgotten IP Cases, Where Do they All Come From…”